May 2013

sole turbot with leeks, potatoes and thyme

Posted on May 31, 2013

Make this if you have dinner guests you want to impress, but you don’t want to be stressed. It turns out so pretty with surprisingly little effort and tastes delicious. Like with all of Judy Rodger’s recipes, the quality of the ingredients is really important because there are so few of them. Find the freshest fish and the richest butter you can and you won’t be disappointed.

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Sole Turbot with Leek and Potato Stew, adapted from the Zuni Cafe Cookbook
2 – 6 oz pieces of white fish 1-1/2 inches thick (we used turbot, but sea bass or black bass are also good options)
1 lb yukon gold potatoes, cut into 1/2 inch chunks
1 1/2 cup leeks or spring onions (we used half and half)
a few sprigs of thyme
1 cup chicken stock
a splash of dry white vermouth
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
a trickle of white wine vinegar

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Season the fish lightly with salt; set aside. Preheat your broiler and place a rack about 6 inches from it.

Place the potatoes in a saucepan and cover with salted water. Bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes, until the potatoes are soft on the outside. Drain the potatoes well and place them in a large ovenproof saute pan. Add the leeks, thyme, chicken stock and vermouth. Set over medium heat and bring to a boil. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add four tablespoons of butter and swirl the pan to melt the butter.

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Reduce the heat to low and add the fish fillets. Baste them with the buttery broth.

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Place the fish under the broiler and cook until the surface is lightly gratineed, about 6 minutes. The liquid should be boiling. Cook a minute or two more and remove from the oven.

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Set the fish aside in a warm place. Place the saute pan on a burner over medium heat to thicken the potato stew, about 3 minutes.  Add the butter and a little white wine vinegar. Season with salt and pepper.  Place several ladles of the hot potato and leek stew on a plate. Top with the fish fillet and serve.

sole-potatoes-leeks-5-Emily

 

farro salad with asparagus, green beans, cucumber and parsley

Posted on May 28, 2013

If you’re feeling that particular need to eat something healthy and full of green stuff—as we often are after a good weekend—make this. It’s a riff on tabbouleh salad and you’ll feel better after eating it. Nothing like lots of veggies and whole grains to set you right. It also keeps well in the fridge so you can enjoy it for lunch the next day if you’re still feeling the need to detox.

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The key to avoiding a bland grain salad is lots and lots of lemon juice. Also be sure to season the water that you’re cooking the grains in – it should taste like sea water.  You could make this with any assortment of veggies you have on hand. It’s a very forgiving salad.

Farro Salad with Asparagus, Green Beans and Herbs
1 1/2 cups farro (we used Trader Joe’s 10 Minute Farro, which makes this a quick meal)
1 bunch parsley, chopped
1 shallot, diced
1 lemon, zested and juiced
1 cucumber, cut into 1/2″ cubes
1 cup asparagus, cut into 1″ pieces
1 cup green beans, cut into 1″ pieces
olive oil, salt and pepper
mixed greens
goat cheese, for serving

Cook the farro according to the package directions. In a large bowl, combine chopped parsley, shallot, lemon juice and zest and cucumber.

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Put a pot of salted water to boil. Blanche the asparagus and green beens for a few minutes, until just tender. Rinse with cold water to stop their cooking. Add them to the large bowl.

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Add the farro and toss with olive oil, salt and pepper. Add more lemon juice if necessary. Make a bed of salad greens on a plate. Spoon some of farro salad on top of the greens. Top with a little goat cheese to serve. Enjoy!

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looking fresh!

Posted on May 21, 2013

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Three years ago when Jordan and I started this blog, we never thought we’d to keep it up this long. Like several previous blogging attempts, I fully expected it to fizzle out after a few months. But somehow, cooking and sharing our stories here has really stuck. Because of this blog, I’ve become a much better cook, a more adventurous eater, a better photographer and a better writer too. I couldn’t be happier than when my tiny apartment kitchen is full of friends and food, leaving me with stories and recipes to share.

Because it seems like this blogging thing might stick around for a while, I decided to try my hand at a redesign. We hadn’t changed anything about the blog since we started it a few years ago and it was time. Now here we are with a new logo, cleaner design, and mobile optimized! With any luck, an updated recipe index will soon follow. If there’s something new you’d like to see, here’s your chance to let us know.

And lastly, a huge thanks to you for reading and commenting and cooking our recipes. It means the world to me.

Xo,
Emily

creamy pasta with dill and smoked salmon

Posted on May 3, 2013

I never used to eat fish. I basically avoided it, except for the very occasional piece of grilled salmon at a family party. Until I met Jordan. Jordan is a lover of fish. He was quick to introduce me to sushi, moules frites and smoked salmon. And, since I was very eager for him to like me, I ate them, lifelong avoidance set aside. Turns out he was right, all those fish, they deserve my love.

This particular pasta is a Jordan dish. He never failed to make it when he’d come to visit me at school or when I was home over the summer. It’s lovely all year round. One Valentine’s Day when Jordan was visiting me in D.C., we took the Metro to Eastern Market, wandered into a cooking store, splurged on our first All-Clad saute plan, and then went home to christen it with this dish. Really any pan that gets hot will do, and it’s pretty silly to buy All-Clad when you live in student housing, but that’s the story. Obviously, we still have the pan; those things are rock solid.

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Creamy Pasta with Dill and Smoked Salmon 
1 lb bow tie pasta
2 tablespoons butter
1 shallot, minced
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 1/2 cups cream
1/4 cup dill, chopped
1/2 lemon, juiced
6 oz smoked salmon, cut into 1″ pieces

Put a pot of salted water to boil. In a large saute pan over medium-low, heat the butter. Saute the shallot in butter for a few minutes, until softened but not brown. Deglaze with the wine. Let the wine reduce slightly, about 3 minutes. Add the cream and turn the heat to low. Let the sauce come to a boil and thicken, stirring often.

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Cook the pasta until al dente and drain. Turn the heat off on the sauce, add the dill and lemon juice. Toss the pasta with the sauce. Top with smoked salmon to serve.

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If you’re only cooking for two, you might want to cut this recipe in half. Sadly, this pasta does not reheat well. The cream gets absorbed by the pasta and the smoked salmon is overcooked by the time the pasta is heated through. Microwaved cream sauces really are a travesty.

-Emily